Tangible Self-Report Devices: Accuracy and Resolution of Participant Input (bibtex)
by van Berkel, Niels, Merritt, Timothy, Bruun, Anders and Skov, Mikael B.
Abstract:
Tangible input has been explored as a means for participants to self-report experiences while minimising disruption and allowing for discrete data collection. However, the accuracy of these tangible devices has not been studied systematically. We compared six input techniques, including slider, slider with resistance, capacitive touch slider, squeeze, rotary knob, and joystick, to understand their accuracy and resolution profile. Each of these wireless devices was designed in a similar form factor and intended to be operated discretely with one hand. We assessed input accuracy and participant perceptions across devices through a controlled lab study (N=20), highlighting diverging limits to the accuracy of the input technique and possible explanations for the differences in resolution. Our results indicate that participant accuracy was highest using a slider, and lowest using a squeeze-based input. We discuss the suitability and challenges of discreet tangible self-report techniques, and highlight open research questions for future work.
Reference:
N. van Berkel, T. Merritt, A. Bruun, M. B. Skov, "Tangible Self-Report Devices: Accuracy and Resolution of Participant Input", in Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI'22), 2022, to appear.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{Berkel2022TangibleSelfReport,
	Abstract = {Tangible input has been explored as a means for participants to self-report experiences while minimising disruption and allowing for discrete data collection. However, the accuracy of these tangible devices has not been studied systematically. We compared six input techniques, including slider, slider with resistance, capacitive touch slider, squeeze, rotary knob, and joystick, to understand their accuracy and resolution profile. Each of these wireless devices was designed in a similar form factor and intended to be operated discretely with one hand. We assessed input accuracy and participant perceptions across devices through a controlled lab study (N=20), highlighting diverging limits to the accuracy of the input technique and possible explanations for the differences in resolution. Our results indicate that participant accuracy was highest using a slider, and lowest using a squeeze-based input. We discuss the suitability and challenges of discreet tangible self-report techniques, and highlight open research questions for future work.},
	Author = {van Berkel, Niels and Merritt, Timothy and Bruun, Anders and Skov, Mikael B.},
	Booktitle = {Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction},
	Location = {TEI'22},
	Pages = {to appear},
	Title = {Tangible Self-Report Devices: Accuracy and Resolution of Participant Input},
	Year = {2022},
	BFI = {BFI 1}}
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